Comey may be many things, but is he really a liar?

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Media captionComey assesses Trump in new memoir

So let's cut straight to it. I've been reading the book, and watched the interview. I also spent hours listening to James Comey giving testimony to Congress before he was fired and afterwards. And my views about him have coalesced.

I think he is vain, arrogant, pious, slightly pompous, supercilious, faux-naïve over the Hillary Clinton emails and the role he played in determining the outcome of the election, and sly in the personal comments he makes about Donald Trump - orange face, white half-moon eyes and (not unusually small) hands.

A little juvenile, no? And most of all I think it is the lowest of political smears to give credence to the Moscow hotel peeing prostitutes story on the basis of salacious and unsubstantiated claims.

"I honestly never thought these words would come out of my mouth, but I don't know whether the current president of the United States was with prostitutes peeing on each other in Moscow in 2013," Comey said in an interview with ABC News.

Well if you don't know, then don't say it. If the long serving prosecutor (as he was in his younger days) had said that in court, the defence would have risen and said "Objection your honour, conjecture". And the judge would have sustained that objection.

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Stormy Daniels and Trump: Should the president be worried?

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Media captionStormy Daniels: 'I was threatened'

A porn star has given details in a television interview of an alleged affair with the US president. What impact might this have on Donald Trump?

Like kids waiting for Santa to come down the chimney, how can the expectation and anticipation ever live up to the reality?

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Tillerson sacking: Where it went wrong for Rex

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Media captionFrom "moron" to "castration": a history of Trump v Tillerson bust-ups

The Las Vegas shootings were Donald Trump's first experience of being consoler-in-chief.

After a man barricaded himself into the Mandalay Bay hotel and over a terrifying 10 minutes opened fire on concertgoers below, killing dozens and injuring hundreds, the president went to Vegas and met families, first responders, medics and the emergency services.

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Florida shooting: Why the NRA wields so much power

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Media captionPresident Trump has become an enthusiastic supporter of the NRA

Every time there's a mass shooting in America there are calls for action to stop it from happening again. But any effort to introduce stricter gun laws always falters in the US Congress - and that's in large part because of the power of the National Rifle Association. Here's a closer look at how they wield that power.

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What is Trumpism?

US President Donald J. Trump Image copyright Getty Images

It was repeatedly said during the 2016 presidential campaign that the press never really got why Donald Trump was doing so well, summed up in a brilliant sound bite coined by a US journalist, who said that the media took him literally and not seriously, while the American public took him seriously but not literally.

In other words, Trump supporters knew there was boasting and braggadocio. They knew he wouldn't do exactly what he said, but they liked the sentiment, all summed up in his blood and thunder inaugural speech.

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Trump-Bannon: A political knife fight with consequences

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Media captionWhite House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders explains why Mr Trump rounded on his former adviser Steve Bannon

It's not unusual for former political allies to fall out. It happens all the time. But normally it's done in private, and maybe hinted at in public. Not this time. Not with this President.

This is a vicious knife fight between Donald Trump and his former campaign chief and White House Chief strategist being played out across social media.

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Donald Trump tumbles to earth with a bump

Trump at rally in Pensacola, Florida - 8 December Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Mr Trump had urged supporters to vote for Mr Moore

For Roy Moore it looks like the next time he saddles up his horse it will be to ride off into the sunset.

The maverick Christian conservative who enjoyed the full-throated support of Steve Bannon, the slightly-more-tempered endorsement of Donald Trump and the outright antipathy of certain sections of the GOP, has failed in the reddest of red states. So how much should be read into this defeat?

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Is Donald Trump winning?

Donald Trump (front R) and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (front L) return in a golf cart after playing a round of golf Image copyright Getty Images

This president has played a lot of golf since he won the election. He seems to do a lot of his business on the lush Trump properties - senators are invited to come and play a round while he can bend their ear to back this or that cause.

The way the president does business is not always pretty. There seems to be unnecessary noise and more collateral damage than there needs to be.

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What Donald Trump did on his summer holiday

President Donald J. Trump arrives at the The White House on the presidential helicopter Image copyright Getty Images

This week across America, millions of children will be getting ready to go back to school and returning home that evening with their first work assignment - an essay with the title: "What I did on my summer holidays."

Now imagine for a second you're Donald Trump, and you've just been given that piece of homework. I think the first thing you're going to do is ask for a few extra sheets of paper because, what a summer.

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Trump proves G20 is less than sum of its parts

International leaders attend the group photo on the first day of the G20 economic summit in Hamburg, Germany, 7 July 2017 Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption International leaders failed to get Mr Trump to recommit to the Paris climate agreement

We'll get to the G20 in a moment. But let's start with organisational psychology. There are some groups or teams that are greater than the sum of their parts, and there are others - that for all the talent and power they may have individually - are less.

Think soccer. Think last year's European Championship. Then tiny little Iceland were the heroes of the competition - and not just because of their wonderful fans.

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